Medical teachers, students deploy humor, positivity in Covid-19 hotspot

Medical teachers and students in Covid-19 hotspot Bac Giang are using gently humorous and positive messages on their protective suits to encourage and motivate each other.
36 lecturers and students of the Hanoi-based Vietnam University of Tractional Medicine set out to aid northern Bac Giang Province in fighting the virus on the morning of May 27, three days after Health Minister Nguyen Thanh Long asked for volunteers to help out Covid hotspots Bac Giang and Bac Ninh.Thousands of volunteers from the military medical forces, medical students from northern Hai Duong Province, doctors and nurses from other localities have headed to epicenter Bac Giang to lend their supports.

On the morning of May 27, 36 lecturers and students of the Hanoi-based Vietnam University of Traditional Medicine set out to help the northern province of Bac Giang Province fight the Covid-19. They were responding to a call by Health Minister Nguyen Thanh Long for volunteers to help out at pandemic hotspots Bac Giang and Bac Ninh.
Thousands of volunteers from the military medical forces, medical students from northern Hai Duong Province, as well as doctors and nurses from other localities have headed to Bac Giang.

Volunteers were assigned to take samples for Covid-19 testing for people in the provinces Van Trung Industrial Park and other areas with high risk of infections like Viet Yen District, where there is a dense population are factory workers. On average, the team collects more than 2,000 samples per day.

Volunteers were assigned to take samples for Covid-19 testing for people in the province's Van Trung Industrial Park and other areas with high risk of infections like Viet Yen District, where there is a dense population are factory workers. On average, the team collects more than 2,000 samples per day.

During hot days of 40 degrees Celsius, fourth-year students used markers to write on the back of their protective gear, jokingly calling the volunteer group Covid Hunting Squad.To detect the fastest positive cases from the community, Bac Giang took samples for testing on a large scale in residential areas around the industrial zone, using both rapid antigen testing and Realtime - PCR testing. Thanks to the support of thousands of volunteers, the province has taken more than 808,000 test samples, by the end of June 1.

Under the scorching 40 degrees Celsius weather, a group of fourth-year student volunteers have used markers to identify themselves as "Covid Hunters."
To quickly detect infected people in the community, healthcare workers have been conducting mass Covid-19 testing in residential areas around the province's industrial zones, using both rapid antigen tests and real-time polymerase chain reaction tests. Thanks to thousands of volunteers, the province had collected more than 808,000 samples by June 1.

Mai Phuong, a female volunteer, drew cartoon characters and wrote her name on the back of her protective suits so other members and easily identify her.Huynh Thi Hong Nhung, a teacher, shared that volunteers came up with the idea in hope that it will cheer up everyone spirits under the humid weather.

Mai Phuong, a female volunteer, drew cartoon characters and wrote her name on the back of her protective suits so other members and easily identify her.
Huynh Thi Hong Nhung, a teacher, shared that volunteers came up with the idea in hope that it will cheer up everyone spirits under the humid weather.

Nguyen Hue, a final year student, was introduced by her classmates to her personal facebook and no lover information on her protective gear. Among the group of 29 female students, some of them weigh less than 40 kg but have not refused any assigned work.

Nguyen Hue, a final year student, wears a protective suit with her Facebook account's handle and a sardonic, hopeful note: "Still single." The women, some of them puny at less than 40 kg, have taken on heavy, labor intensive tasks without complaint.

Collecting samples takes place in early morning and late evening to evade the scorching sun and ensure the health of medical volunteers.On June 1, the team received the target of taking more than 3,000 test samples in residential areas. The group started out their days at 4:30 a.m. and wrapped up at 10 a.m. After taking a small break, they resumed work at 5 p.m. when the weather was cooler and finished at 8 p.m. A total of more than 26,200 test samples were collected in the entire province that same day.

Collecting samples takes place in early morning and late evening to evade the scorching sun and ensure the health of medical volunteers.
On June 1, the team received the target of taking more than 3,000 test samples in residential areas. The group started out their days at 4.30 a.m. and wrapped up at 10 a.m. After taking a small break, they resumed work at 5 p.m. when the weather was cooler and finished at 8 p.m. A total of more than 26,200 test samples were collected in the entire province that same day.

Volunteers took advantage of the break time to place ice packs to their shoulders and head to relieve some of the heat and reduce fatigue, trying to cool down under the hot summer weather.

Volunteers take advantage of a break to place ice packs to their limbs and head for some relief from the heat and fatigue.

Nhung in her protective suit with the slogan Fatigue is a state of mind.Since it is their first time to volunteering at an epicenter, it took the teachers and students the first 1-2 days to get familar and used to the workload. So far, everything went smoothly and no one was exhausted or fainted yet and the group has been receiving bread and milk as a form of thank you.

Nhung wears a protective suit with the slogan, "Fatigue is a state of mind."
Since it is their first time volunteering at an epicenter, it took the teachers and students the first 1-2 days to get familar with and used to the workload. So far, everything has gone well. No one has fainted of exhaustion or been burnt out otherwise. During break time, Nhung regularly posts images of teachers and students online to update the school, parents and colleagues about their well-being.
"We're fine here, we don't lack food and we don't lack spirit. So everyone at home, please rest assured," she says.

Mask lines printed on the faces of two female students Nguyen Viet Ha (left photo) and Pham Thu Phuong (right). Leaving the secret epidemic prevention outfit after many hours of sampling, the medical clothes inside are always wet, the sweat cant get out of the feet. But teachers and students encouraged each other to wear a level 4 protective suit, which means entering the inner circle, where the risk is high, so you must make a worthy contribution.

The two female student volunteers, Nguyen Viet Ha (L) and Pham Thu Phuong, bear scars that masks have left on their faces. Wearing protective suits all day also creates some problems like rashes.

Here are a lot of chicken feet soaked in lemongrass, the medical student showed off her wrinkled hands after hours of soaking in sweat, incubating the smell of rubber on her personal page with a caption.

Volunteers show off their wrinkled hands after hours of being drenching in sweat and repeated use of alcohol based sanitizers. Their hands smell like rubber, the volunteers say on social media.

Teachers in the delegation of the Academy of Traditional Medicine and Pharmacy constantly received messages from second-year and third-year students asking when the school had the next support round, they were ready to go.At the call of the leaders of the Ministry of Health, in addition to 1,400 medical workers supporting Bac Giang, 28,000 other people have also registered to enter the epidemic center.

Volunteer teachers say they constantly receive messages from second-year and third-year students asking when the school will recruit more volunteers so they can sign up.
After Ministry of Health's announcement calling for volunteers, in addition to 1,400 medical workers, 28,000 other people have also registered their willingness to work in Bac Giang.

Photos courtesy of Vietnam University of Traditional Medicine's volunteer group



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